Georgians for Equal Justice

In 2014, Equal Justice America launched its Georgians for Equal Justice campaign to increase legal services to the poor by creating additional Law Student Fellowships in the state, putting more law students to work with Georgia legal aid organizations.

Funding for EJA Fellowships for Atlanta’s John Marshall, Emory University, University of Georgia, Georgia State University and Mercer University law students derive from our Georgians for Equal Justice campaign. (To be eligible for an EJA Fellowship, students from these schools must find placements with legal aid organizations in Georgia.)

The following law students have received fellowships from Equal Justice America since our launch of Georgians for Equal Justice. Your support will help us expand our program to put more law students to work in Georgia on behalf of the poor.

We need your help!

(Equal Justice America is an independent non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation unaffiliated with any law school.)

Please click the links below to read letters from the students and/or their supervisors on their EJA Fellowship experiences.

Iulia Caizer

“I fear that any words of appreciation will not do justice to the laudable work of the great team behind the Equal Justice America Fellowship. If during law school we all dream to be our best in the legal practice, to always fight the good fight and to never deny legal services to those in dire need, the reality, unfortunately, sometimes falls far away from our expectations. When demand for legal services in the low-income communities is high, but the funding is scarce or threaten to be cut off, practicing public interest law right after law school becomes an illusion or a struggle. I am so appreciative to Equal Justice America for fighting against the odds and making it possible for so many law students to pursue their choice of practice and work in public interest law right after law school!” –Iulia Caizer, Georgia State University, EJA Summer Fellow 2017

Summer 2018
  • Jennifer Mendoza (University of Washington) worked in the Immigration Justice Practice Group at the Southern Poverty Law Center in Atlanta.
Summer 2017
Summer 2016
  • Young Choi (Columbia University) worked at the Farmworker Rights Division of the Georgia Legal Services Program in Atlanta.
  • Abby Herrmann (Georgia State) and Harris Mason (University of Georgia) worked at the Atlanta Legal Aid Society.
  • Rodney Holcombe II (University of Pennsylvania) worked at the Southern Center for Human Rights in Atlanta.
Summer 2015
  • Kai Gill (Columbia University) worked at Georgia Legal Services in Atlanta.

  • Kristi Oakes (Mercer University) worked at the Atlanta Legal Aid Society.

  • Eric Sterling (University of Georgia) worked at the Georgia Law Center for the Homeless in Atlanta.

Summer 2014
  • Faatima Ally (Mercer University) worked at the Georgia Legal Services Program in Macon.
  • Pardis Bakheshi (Mercer University) worked at the Dekalb County Child Advocacy Center.
  • Erin Coleman (John Marshall Law School) worked at the Atlanta Volunteer Lawyers Foundation.
  • Kristina Ducos (John Marshall Law School) worked at the Partnership Against Domstic Violence in Atlanta.
  • Fuery Hocking (Georgia State) and Allison Parrish (University of Georgia) worked at the Atlanta Legal Aid Society.